Natural Equine Health Solutions

Optim Equine brings a unique approach to optimising horse health, wellbeing and performance.

Combining scientific evidence-based medicine with traditional naturopathic practices, Optim Equine delivers the most effective and beneficial health outcomes for your horse.

Latest Facebook Posts

1 day ago

Optim Equine
EQUITANA Australia. It’s almost here!Super excited to be presenting this year on two popular topics relevant to all horse people: GUT HEALTH IN THE HORSE and THE ROLE OF SUPPLEMENTS.Super Ticket Presale is on this Friday at 9am...Trot to it!FULL LINEUP IS HERE 👀🤩The long awaited EQUITANA Melbourne 2021 Lineup and schedule are finally out! 🇦🇺 What do you think of our all Australian lineup?View the full schedule here - www.equitana.com.au/event-schedule/Don't forget, Super Ticket Presale is on this FRIDAY 16th at 9am!Make sure you've signed up to get access so you can snap up the best seats in the grandstand before everyone else!📲Sign up here - www.equitana.com.au/super-ticket-presale/ ...
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5 days ago

Optim Equine
🏇SUSPENSORY LIGAMENT INJURIES IN THE HORSE🐴The most common ligament that horses injure is the suspensory ligament and branches of the ligament where it attaches to the bone. The ligament begins at its attachment to the back of the upper cannon bone in both the fore and hind limbs. It runs downwards close to the back of the cannon bone before dividing into two branches each of which attaches to one of the sesamoid bones at the back of the fetlock. Some fibres continue and attach to the upper pastern area.The suspensory ligament supports the fetlock and protects it from hyperextension (ie. dropping too low during exercise). Injuries to this ligament can occur anywhere along its length: most commonly at the bottom of the ligament or in the branches where the suspensory inserts onto the sesamoid bones. Injuries to these parts of the suspensory are most commonly a result of repetitive excessive loading/insufficient recovery. That is, the damage is usually cumulative over a period of time- making it an ‘overuse’ injury as opposed to having an acute/sudden onset.Alternatively core lesions of the suspensory tend to have a sudden/acute onset. Core lesions are when a ‘hole' in the ligament can be seen on ultrasound in the centre of the body of the ligament or in a branch of the ligament. The ‘hole shows’ where a number of fibres have ruptured. Without proper rehabilitation, rates of injury recurrence are high.In order to promote the best possible chance of the horse performing again at it’s full potential, a graduated exercise and loading program is essential. Supporting this with appropriate dietary and neturaceutical intervention and specific herbal medicines can help to facilitate fibre alignment and integrity, reduce excessive scar tissue formation and promote optimal healing....📸 @whishawrobyn ...#horsehealth #horsesofinstagram #horse #racehorses #performancehorse #eventing #ottb #suspensoryrehab #suspensoryinjury ...
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3 weeks ago

Optim Equine
The importance of cooling our horses down: Don’t forget the basics!!Prior to competing, most riders are consistently reliable in properly warming up their horses prior to competition. We know this facilitates a gradual increase in our horse’s heart rate, body temperature and blood flow. It helps their muscles, tendons, ligaments and neuromuscular system prepare for the impending exercise. During this time, many riders practice key cues that they may need to get the best out of their horse. Basically, it gets both horse and rider ready to perform.But how many of us can say that we consistently properly cool our horses down post events or even regular rides? That we gently trot then walk our horses out for an extended period post exercise? All too often we do our event, hop off our horses, offer them water, give them a hay net tie them to the truck/float, and go about watching the events around us. If you’re competing later in the day too, some riders will simply hop off, untack then load their horses up for the journey home.If we want our horses to recovery properly we need to COOL -THEM -DOWN. It doesn’t cost a cent, yet has the potential to yield significant benefit. The importance of this is heightened in disciplines where there is multiple events in one day, or successive days of competition (think eventing, multiple dressage tests or showjumping rounds, polocrosse, etc).Cooling your horse down after they work or compete allows for a gradual recovery of pre-exercise heart rate and blood pressure. It helps to slowly bring their body temperature down and regulate blood flow. It helps to promote the clearance of lactic acid, potentially reducing muscle stiffness and cramping.In a day and age where competitors are constantly looking at recovery supplements, massage devices, compression gear, iceboots, technology, etc to enhance performance, don’t forget the basics!! Properly cooling down is the best place to start…...📸@whishawrobyn ...#horsesofinstagram #equestrian #eventing #performancehorse #crosscountry #ponyclub #horseriding #ottbsofinstagram #horsehealth ...
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4 weeks ago

Optim Equine
Ever wondered why we are taught to approach a horse from the shoulder?The shoulder is a non-threatening area: in the wild, predators rarely attack a horse at the shoulder as it is unlikely to deliver a lethal blow. Instead, they attack from above, beneath or behind the horse. They do not approach from a position where their attack could be clearly seen and detected. ....Photo credit: Robyn Whishaw ...
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1 month ago

Optim Equine
Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the horse. Is GLUTEN a culprit?Equine Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) describes a group of diseases effecting the mucosa and submucosa of the intestinal wall. It is characterised by the abnormal infiltration of inflammatory cells in the intestinal wall. The cause(s) of IBD are not fully understood, however, it is thought that abnormal immune responses to bacterial, viral, parasitic, and/or dietary antigens play a key role. One such dietary allergen which has been highlighted is gluten, a protein which causes intestinal damage to people who suffer from coeliac disease. In recent years, gliadin (a component of gluten) has been reported to increase the permeability of the small intestinal mucosa and cause concurrent intestinal inflammation associated with IBD in the horse.The key takeaway points from this are that diet CAN and DOES play an essential role in the health of the horse- beyond merely providing energy to fuel their work (not to mention growth and metabolic processes). As with any health condition in the horse (ESPECIALLY IBD), diet needs to be addressed for effective treatment/management of the condition in the horse. If the allergen remains in the diet, then inflammation and intestinal damage persists, despite treatment. ...
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