Natural Equine Health Solutions

Optim Equine brings a unique approach to optimising horse health, wellbeing and performance.

Combining scientific evidence-based medicine with traditional naturopathic practices, Optim Equine delivers the most effective and beneficial health outcomes for your horse.

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2 weeks ago

Optim Equine
Due to lockdown in Vic, I have extended my visit to Tassie. I have a couple of spare appointments this week and early next week.I will be in the south of the state on Friday 30th and Sat 31st, with the remainder of the time in the north.If you’re having challenges with your horse’s health, or are confused with the best diet and appropriate supplementation for your horse, then don’t hesitate to get in touch and I’ll do my best to fit you in 😊 ...
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2 weeks ago

Optim Equine
WINDSUCKING & CRIBBINGWindsucking and cribbing, like many health and behavioural challenges in our horses, can have a variety of causative and contributing factors. One commonly implicated factor may be lack of forage in the horse’s diet and particularly long-stem fibre (such as that found in hay).Unlike humans who can salivate at the thought, sight, smell or taste of food- horses only produce saliva when chewing. Saliva is made up of several key components, one of these being bicarbonate- which helps to buffer stomach contents.A horse must chew approximately 1000 times to consume 1kg of hay in comparison to chewing only 200 times to grind 1kg of oats. Remember that every time a horse chews, they are producing saliva. Therefore, more chewing = more saliva production = more buffering of stomach contents.Windsucking and cribbing are thought to possibly be an attempt to increase saliva flow to help relieve gastric irritation. If this is indeed true, then horses who crib and windsuck may be caught in a vicious cycle where they begin to crib or windsuck to try and alleviate gastric irritation, but the cribbing/windsucking itself may reduce the actual amount of forage they consume, thereby further compromising their gastric health....📸 @whishawrobyn ...#horse #horsesofinstagram #horsehealth #equinelife #horsenutrition #equestrianproblems #equestrian #equestrianlife #broodmare #ottbsofinstagram #cribbinghorse #performancehorse ...
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4 weeks ago

Optim Equine
STALLION FERTILITY AND LIBIDOWith stud season rapidly approaching in the Southern Hemisphere, our thoughts turn towards stallion fertility and libido. There are few things more frustrating for the stud and stallion manager and breeder than a stallion with fertility and/or libido issues. Increased number of covers per mare, increased time in the shed, increased stress on all involved. It’s enough hard work managing books to each individual stallion and undertaking covers- let alone working out WHY your stallion is performing sub par.Each stallion is unique and the causes of sub-optimal fertility and libido are individual. Often there are several factors (as opposed to one single component) contributing to why they aren’t performing up to scratch. It can seem like you have very few sustainable and effective options to improve your situation, yet this doesn’t have to be the case.There are many effective nutritional and herbal therapeutics, which, when combined with suitable management practices can turn some of the most challenging cases around. When treatments are tailored to the individual stallion and the specific components of his fertility or libido which are letting him down are addressed, your chances of happy endings are greatly increased! Don’t let a stallion’s poor sperm motility, morphology, low sperm count or low testosterone levels get you down…....📸 @whishawrobyn ...#stallion #studseason #thoroughbred #thoroughbredsofinstagram #breedingseason #racehorses #bloodstock #equine #fertility #horsestud ...
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1 month ago

Optim Equine
MULTI MINERAL LICKS: NOT AS GREAT AS YOU MAY THINK…Many well meaning owners, trainers and stud managers give their horses access to multi mineral licks (also often referred to as balancer licks, mineral blocks, vitamin licks, etc), in the belief that they will ensure that their horse’s basic daily mineral and vitamin needs will be met. Most are under the impression that horses will consume these licks in accordance to their needs.Whilst this may be convenient to think, in reality, its highly likely to be doing a disservice to your horse’s health, wellbeing and performance.With the exception of salt, there is very little research to suggest that horses seek out minerals in accordance to what their body needs. Most horses seek to consume these licks due to the flavours added (commonly molasses). How do you know how much your horse is/isn’t consuming of these licks? Are they consuming too little or too much in accordance to their daily requirements? Remember that consuming excessively high levels of particular minerals can have health effects just as undesirable as consuming inadequate amounts of specific minerals.If the horses are indeed being driven to consume the salt in the lick, then no control exists over the quantities of the other minerals they are ingesting, as the very nature of these products combines all minerals in a set formulation…Remember that high levels of particular minerals can have effects as undesirable as levels too low. Think of multi mineral licks a little like kids gummy multivitamins/minerals. Most kids love to consume them- they are sweet and taste good. If they have access to the whole jar, they may well eat all the gummies. This isn’t because they are necessarily deficient in those vitamins/minerals. They like the taste and novelty of the lollies. They are unlikely to stop at one and go ‘well I’ve consumed my daily quota of zinc today, I don’t want anymore’. There will be days when they don’t consume them (being preoccupied with other things) or they are out of sight, out of mind. There may also be other days where they may consume them simply out of boredom.Don’t leave your horse’s nutritional requirements to chance… ...
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1 month ago

Optim Equine
LEVOTHYROXINE USE IN PERFORMANCE HORSES AND RACEHORSES…Levothyroxine, also known as L-thyroxine or T4, is a synthetic form of the thyroid hormone thyroxine, which is normally secreted by the follicular cells of the thyroid gland. In the case of race and performance horses, levothyroxine is commonly supplemented to help strip weight off horses and/or to help horses ‘perk up’. Yet research indicates that in fit horses- supplementing with thyroxine actually resulted in the horses fatiguing quicker. Its use was also associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia- hardly performance enhancing! In cases of respiratory infection, the use of levothyroxine may actually prolong the infection.Supplementation of synthetic hormones in horses is not something which should be taken lightly. True hypothyroidism in horses is a rare condition- and when it does occur, reasons as to WHY it has occurred should be addressed first, or in conjunction with appropriate treatment. Thorough assessment of thyroid function MUST extend beyond just testing thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Testing T4 levels alone (or in conjunction with TSH) is also insufficient to provide reliable information to determine the true state of thyroid function. T3 also needs to be included. As does a thorough physical assessment and case history, analysis of the horse’s diet/nutritional intake, current medication and/or supplement use.It also needs to be remembered that abnormal thyroid hormone concentrations can occur after a high grain diet meal, after extensive travel, training stress, or if a horse is ill.In cases of sub-clinical hypothyroidism, specific nutritional insufficiencies/deficiencies are commonly implicated. Similarly overtraining without sufficient rest/recovery/adaptation periods can lead to impaired thyroid function. No amount of levothyroxine supplementation can rectify these performance and health limiting factors- thus without addressing the causes, the problems remain....📸 @whishawrobyn ...#equestrian #equinelife #equinehealth #equinevet #equinenutrition #stablelife #horseracing #thoroughbreds #thoroughbredsofinstagram ...
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